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Cross Gabled Roof

A cross gabled roof has
additional sections or wings crossing perpendicular to the main
section, meeting in a valley, each with its own peaked or gabled facade. A normal gabled house is a simple rectangle, and a
cross gable roof allows a more complex shape and therefore a more
complex layout.

Often, the main part of
a house will have a gabled roof while the cross gabled roof on the
extended portion will be lower than the main part. An example of this
type of architecture is the Gothic Revival style that was popular in
the United States between 1855 and 1870. Characterized by an overall
picturesque cottage appearance, this style home was built with a
steeply pitched (gabled) roof with at least one cross gable.

Other types of
architecture that were characterized in part by their cross gabled
roofs include Stick (circa 1870-1890), in which the style’s
typical decorative trusses are typical found; and the Tudor revival
(circa 1920-1940) which is characterized by a steeply pitched end or
cross gable roof.

Shingle and Bungalow
styled homes also often have cross gabled roofs. Some architectural
forms, particularly the Bungalow and Shingle styles expose the cross
gabling trusses and beams. This became a trend in many types of
contemporary architecture to provide a rustic flavor to the
architecture that also gave rooms a lofty or voluminous style.

Cross gabling provides
for wings to be added to homes as they become needed or affordable.
Built in 1668 for the merchant, Capt. John Turner, the House of Seven
Gables, located in Salem, Massachusetts is a good example of this
practice. The house presently has eight gables.

One of the most dramatic and interesting roofs available is the cross gabled roof. It may be more complicated and expensive than other roofing types, but many believe that the end result is well worth it. Here is some more information to help you decide if a cross gabled roof is the right style for your home.

Costs

Certainly more complicated to build than regular gable roofs, the cost of a cross gabled roof depends on the type and quality of the materials used, the size of the home, and the cost of labor. Contact a local roofer for price quotes and more information.

Pros

Cross gabled roofs add a striking aesthetic appeal to a variety of homes.

Its slope allows for easy water run-off.

Cross gabled roofs allow for a more complex home layout.

Cons

Cross gabled roofs are more complicated and more expensive to build than other types of roofs.

They may sustain considerable damage in high winds.

Durability

Cross gabled roofs, like regular gable roofs, are considered a great roofing choice when it comes to encouraging water runoff from big rain or snow storms. However, in areas that experience severe storms and hurricanes, they simply can’t withstand the high winds. Other than that, the overall durability depends on the materials used to build the roof.

Common Questions and Answers

What are the characteristics of a cross gabled roof?

A cross gabled roof has additional sections (wings) crossing perpendicular to the main section, meeting in a valley, each with its own peaked or gabled facade. A normal gable house is a simple rectangle, and a cross gabled roof allows a more complex sh

What style of home utilizes the cross gable roof?

Shingle and Bungalow-style homes often have cross gabled roofs. Some architectural forms, particularly the Bungalow and Shingle styles, expose the cross gabling trusses and beams. This has become a trend in many types of contemporary architecture because

History

Cross gabled roofs became common with the Gothic Revival style that was popular in the United States between 1855 and 1870. Other types of architecture that were characterized in part by their cross gabled roofs include Stick (circa 1870-1890), in which the style’s typical decorative trusses are found, as well as the Tudor revival (circa 1920-1940), characterized by a steeply pitched end or cross gabled roof.

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